Print

Green

Green

When producing green tea in China, the freshly-plucked tea
leaves are heated in large pans at a temperature of approx.
80°C right after harvesting. In Japan, the freshly plucked
leaves are steamed over hot water for a moment. The split ferments
are destroyed, the fermentation interrupted. The leaves
keep their natural dark-green colour.
After heating/steaming, the tea is rolled up loosely and then
dried immediately and packed.
In China and Japan one says: - Drinking green tea conduces
the care of life- .
You can find green tea in every variation. Whether small and
round with long, light-green leaves or dark-green and wiry -
not to mention the variations in taste.
Preparation:
The tannin in green tea is released faster than in black tea.
In order to avoid the bitter taste, boil the water once and then
cool it down to 80°-90°C. In the case of the Japanese teas, let
the water cool down to even 60°-70°C before brewing the tea.
Green tea can be infused several times from the same leaves.

 


Flavour

Flavour

Flavoured teas look back at a long Far Eastern tradition. Since 18th century teas have been flavoured with e.g. jasmine-, roseand peach petals. Earl Grey tea, which was named after the British Prime Minister Edward Grey, Earl of Falladon, is probably the most famous flavoured tea; bergamotte oil is added to it. The enthusiasm for flavoured teas has been constantly increased since the 70s. The harmonious combination of tea, ingredients and aromas greatly depends