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Black Tea

Black Tea

Black Tea

A tea manufacturer can usually be recognised by the deafening
noise of the machines. As a rule, it is the husband of the tea
pluckers who use their strength and skilfulness to manufacture
tea. The production of orthodox black tea comprises 5 processes
that overlap each other.
Right after plucking, the fresh leaves are spread out on long
grates in the halls made to wither by using hot air. In more
modern factories, this is done in closed hot air channels.
On rolling up the leaves after that in the - cutter- , the cell walls
are broken and the cell juice is released and combines with the
oxygen available in the air. The process of fermentation and
oxidation is set off and the leaves turn copper-red. When later
drying them, the leaves become darker and darker and we talk of
black tea.
The next step is to sieve the leaves whereby the different grades of
leaves are separated from each other.
We differentiate between leaf teas (e.g. FTGFOPI), in broken
teas (e.g. BOP) or fannings (Fngs.), which are the smallest
fragments and are used for the production of teabags.
Preparation:
Depending on where they are grown, the various types of black
tea differ in the intensity of taste and thus require individual
preparation.
Fundamentally, all black teas are brewed with boiling water.
The lighter the tea, the shorter the brewing time. A flowery Darjeeling
should be brewed for a maximum of 3 minutes, a malt,
strong Assam tea on the other hand up to 5 minutes.


Flavour

Flavour

Flavoured teas look back at a long Far Eastern tradition. Since 18th century teas have been flavoured with e.g. jasmine-, rose- and peach petals. Earl Grey tea, which was named after the British Prime Minister Edward Grey, Earl of Falladon, is probably the most famous flavoured tea; bergamotte oil is added to it. The enthusiasm for flavoured teas has been constantly increased since the 70s. The harmonious combination of